Tag Archives: Unemployment

Real Unemployment in March 2011 was 22.0 Percent, Not 8.8 Percent –

How the Obama Administration Lies with Unemployment Statistics

April 11, 2011

By Jerome R. Corsi

The real unemployment rate may be 22.0% for March 2011, not the 8.8 percent reported, according to economist John Williams, author of http://www.shadowstats.com/ the “Shadow Government Statistics” website, who has argued for years that the federal government manipulates the reporting of economic data for political purposes.

In the BLS news release Friday, April 1, 2011, http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm the unemployment rate was reported to have fallen 0.1 percent to 8.8 percent in March 2011, although that is the “seasonally adjusted number.”

According to BLS Table A15, the “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment number for March 2011 was 9.2 percent.

Separately, Gallup disagreed with the BLS, reporting last week that unemployment was 10.0% in March, down from 10.2 percent in mid-March, and 10.3 percent at the end of February, as seen in the following chart:

via Real Unemployment in March 2011 was 22.0 Percent, Not 8.8 Percent –.

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ROI: Is a Crash Coming? Ten Reasons to Be Cautious – WSJ.com

Is a Crash Coming? Ten Reasons to Be Cautious

By BRETT ARENDS

Could Wall Street be about to crash again?

This week’s bone-rattlers may be making you wonder.

I don’t make predictions. That’s a sucker’s game. And I’m certainly not doing so now.

But way too many people are way too complacent this summer. Here are 10 reasons to watch out.

1. The market is already expensive.

2. The Fed is getting nervous.

3. Too many people are too bullish.

4. Deflation is already here.

5. People still owe way too much money.

6. The jobs picture is much worse than they’re telling you. 7. Housing remains a disaster.

8. Labor Day is approaching.

9. We’re looking at gridlock in Washington.

10. All sorts of other indicators are flashing amber.

Read the details via ROI: Is a Crash Coming? Ten Reasons to Be Cautious – WSJ.com.